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BA and Minor degrees offered in Traditional formats

The anthropology faculty at Lindenwood University is made up of active instructors and researchers who bring years of professional experience into the classroom. Besides opportunities to interact with faculty during normal coursework, we also open our research work to students and offer other research opportunities so they can gain practical, hands-on experience.

Lindenwood University offers a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in anthropology in two areas of emphasis, either Archaeology or Cultural Anthropology. A minor in Anthropology and a minor in Ancient World Cultures are also available.

Why Anthropology?

Anthropologists are adventurous by nature. We do what most people only dream of. We travel the world and see things most never will. We are driven by the question of “Why?” Anthropologists find and understand the deep-seated issues that affect society and strive to fix the problem in a lasting way. 

In our Anthropology courses you will learn careful record-keeping, identify detail data, read analytically, and think critically. You will learn how to face social discomfort in different cultural settings and gain strong skills in oral and written expression. Using a range of social, behavioral, biological, and other scientific research methods, anthropology majors learn to supplement statistical findings with descriptive data gathered through working with the people themselves, or with their artifacts, and not just by sitting and watching online media.

Demand for anthropologists is increasing in many areas, stimulated by a growing need for analysts and researchers who can manage, evaluate, and interpret the large volume of data on human behavior. This occupational flexibility reflects the emphasis on breadth, diversity, and independence of thought, which an anthropology degree fosters. There are many career and educational options for anthropology majors. Anthropological study leads to both traditional anthropological careers of teaching and research as well as in Applied Anthropology. If you major in anthropology at Lindenwood, you will have a strong liberal arts degree that gave you exposure and experience in many practical career skills that will prepare you for many different types of careers in our increasingly global world.

Archaeology

Ready to get dirty?

Archaeology at Lindenwood emphasizes student involvement in archaeological research. This, coupled with our courses and lab opportunities gives you the best chances to get into graduate programs and find a job. Our job prep focus is based upon the idea that the more practical experience that students have in this discipline, the better prepared they are for jobs in archaeology both over summers during college or in a career track.  Experience is a key factor in the hiring process for both part-time and full-time positions in archaeology, whether the position is with a government agency or in the private sector. If you take advantage of our practical experience opportunities you will have an edge over other BA holders who only completed classes and a field school. The Archaeology Laboratory offers another opportunity for you to gain experience. Archaeology students of any experience level can work in the lab on specific projects and general artifact sorting and analysis, beginning in their Freshman year. Some paid positions in the lab will be available for experienced students. They will work on artifacts that are part of ongoing archaeological projects, not just comparative collections.

Other opportunities for experience exist through our field projects and field school. While most anthropology departments offer a summer field school, Lindenwood offers its anthropology students the chance to work on other field projects such as battlefield surveys, investigations of exposed shipwrecks, human remains through World War II MIA recovery projects overseas, and surveys for new archaeological sites. These projects are conducted by the faculty sometimes with other professional archaeologists from around the United States and they also give the students exposure to different types of project activities as well as introduces them to the practice of professional networking.

Our coursework covers all general aspects of archaeology and adds more specific knowledge in Historic Archaeology (archaeology since European contact in North America) and Cultural Resource Management (the sub-field that employs the majority of archaeologists worldwide). LU is one of only a few universities that offers a Cultural Resource Management course to undergraduates. Some courses will even give you further field experience and/or opportunities to meet professional archaeologists from outside the university. Our core courses will give you the foundation you need for graduate school in anthropology or related fields, and our electives give you a diverse offering of courses where you can both gain knowledge from varied subfields and build a program based on you personal interests.

Students are encouraged to attend annual, professional conferences in archaeology. Students interested in conducting research are also encouraged to present the results of their work at symposia and conferences. Our students normally present at international, regional, and state conferences around the country each year.

Our courses and experience opportunities together provide a strong background for graduate school and the job market. We believe that our selection of courses and our extra experience opportunities in archaeology offer people like you who are interested in a career in archaeology, significant advantages over other anthropology departments. Our graduates have an excellent track record of being accepted to graduate programs in Anthropology. Check out our Facebook page to see what we have been up to recently. We invite you to visit us and see firsthand, what opportunities we offer our students!

Cultural Anthropology

Want to finally understand why many cultures eat insects as a main course? 

Cultural anthropology students will not only learn why over 1,500 species of bugs are eaten as a regular part of most of the world’s diets, but also learn why other people think that's disgusting!

Cultural anthropology is the study of human culture, society, and behavior around the world. Typically, cultural anthropologists work with living populations but may also use data from the recent and distant past. Like anthropology more broadly, many cultural anthropologists employ a “four-field” holistic approach to understanding human culture.

Cultural anthropology is the study of human culture, society, and behavior around the world. Typically, cultural anthropologists work with living populations but may also use data from the recent and distant past. Like anthropology more broadly, many cultural anthropologists employ a “four-field” holistic approach to understanding human culture.

The interests of cultural anthropologists are broad, encompassing anything and everything that humans say, make, and do as well as the influence that humans have on their environment. If humans do it, cultural anthropologists are interested in it! Cultural anthropologists employ a unique set of methods to observe, describe, and explain human culture. Specifically, cultural anthropologists use an approach called participant observation whereby the anthropologists is completely immersed in a society, attempting to live as the members of that society live. An anthropologist often learns the language of the society in which they are immersed, will live in a typical home, sometimes with a local family, and will eat, sleep, bathe, dress, and socialize as those around them do.

When you study cultural anthropology at Lindenwood University, you will learn to understand human behaviors and institutions in societies around the world by using the holistic approach of anthropology. This perspective will allow you to approach questions and problems in new and creative ways — a skill that is important on a job or in graduate school.

Our new Cultural Anthropology Laboratory opens in the Fall of 2016, making research even more accessible to our majors, and we do have one paid position for the lab for experienced students. LU Anthropology graduates are being accepted to graduate programs all over the world. We invite you to visit us and see firsthand, what opportunities we offer our students!

Earning a Degree in Anthropology at Lindenwood University

Anthropology course requirements

Earning a BA degree in anthropology requires 50 credit hours for either the cultural anthropology or archaeology emphases. Our courses and experience opportunities together provide a strong background for graduate school and the job market. 

Archaeology Emphasis

You must complete 23 credit hours of core courses, and the rest may be chosen from topics like ancient art, the ancient and medieval world, origins of the United States, and more.

Cultural Anthropology Emphasis

You must complete 23 credit hours of core courses, and the rest may be chosen from topics like anthropology of religion, focus on modern Asia, social and cultural change, and more.

Earning a Minor in Anthropology or Ancient World Cultures at Lindenwood University

Lindenwood University offers a minor in anthropology. A minor is simply a secondary academic subject to add to your knowledge, whether it is of professional or personal interest. The minor in anthropology requires 18 credit hours. You will study topics like cultural anthropology, Islamic societies, socio-cultural theory, race and ethnicity, and more.

A minor in ancient world cultures is also offered. Topics you will study include archaeology, history of Western art to 1300, plus the chance to study ancient art, classical myth, Greek literature, and more.

Combining a minor with a major of your choice could make you more marketable to potential employers upon graduation.

What Can You Do with a Degree in Anthropology from Lindenwood University?

Because most high schools do not teach anthropology courses, a normal question to be asked is “What can I do with that degree?”  For people interested in studying any aspect of humanity, the answer would be: Just about anything you want.

Anthropologists are employed in a wide variety of sectors, including colleges and universities, local, state, regional, and federal government agencies, private businesses, Nongovernmental organizations, and health and human services. You will find people with anthropology degrees teaching at universities in departments outside of anthropology, such as architecture/design, biology, business, education, history, international studies, medicine, and public health, among many others.  More than half of all anthropologists work outside of academia. They perform job functions that include things such as research partnerships, assessment of economic issues, public policy, educational programs, community histories, and just about any type of human services. Anthropologists address social and physical consequences of natural disasters, equitable access to limited resources, and human rights.

The anthropology department sponsors a student club that gathers for social occasions and takes numerous field trips each school year. 

Lindenwood University
209 S. Kingshighway
St. Charles, MO 63301