Skip to Main Content

Vol. 10, No. 2 - The Confluence - A regional studies journal published by Lindenwood University Press.

In this issue of The Confluence

  • Diane Everman examines the flight of a St. Louis family from Nazi Germany in 1940.
  • Quinta Scott completes her series on the environmental issues in the Current River in southern Missouri.
  • Daniel Gonzales uses a series of historical locations to chart the history of Mexican immigration in St. Louis in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
  • Bob Moore unveils new details on the 1849 steamboat fire in St. Louis through court testimony about the destruction of Phillips Music Store.

 

Articles

An Extraordinary Odyssey: One Man’s Fight to Stay Free During World War II

An Extraordinary Odyssey: One Man’s Fight to Stay Free During World War II

The Schweich family fled Nazi Germany in 1941 and landed in St. Louis. This is the story of their journey during World War II.

More Info Full Article (PDF)

So Much to Learn: Dye Tracing the Current River Landscape, Part III

So Much to Learn: Dye Tracing the Current River Landscape, Part III

In this third installment of her work on the Current River, Quinta Scott looks at environmental change in the iconic Missouri Waterway

More Info Full Article (PDF)

A Gateway to the East: An Exploration of St. Louis’ Mexican History Through the Built Environment

A Gateway to the East: An Exploration of St. Louis’ Mexican History Through the Built Environment

St. Louis had a relationship with Mexico dating to trade along the Santa Fe Trail starting in the 1820s. It came to include commerce, marketing, and migration starting in the late nineteenth century, as Daniel Gonzales details here

More Info Full Article (PDF)

New Perspectives on the Great Fire of 1849

New Perspectives on the Great Fire of 1849

The story of the fire in St. Louis started by the steamboat White Cloud in 1849 often focuses on the destruction to the business district. This article sheds new light on the happenings during the fire from court testimony surrounding the destruction of Phillips Music Store, through eyewitness accounts.

More Info Full Article (PDF)

Lindenwood University
209 S. Kingshighway
St. Charles, MO 63301