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Fall 2019
/ Winter 2020

Fall 2019
/ Winter 2020

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Vol. 11, No. 1 - The Confluence - A regional studies journal published by Lindenwood University Press.

The Confluence - Fall 2019 / Winter 2020
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In this issue of The Confluence

Zachary Dowdle suggests how lynching became a visible tool for slaveowners to deal with community regulatory issues.

Bryan Jack investigates the signs and their meanings in downtown St. Louis. Starting in the 1930s, the City of St. Louis began marking historic sites with a collection of signs for sites to draw attention to community memory.

Lawrence Celani explains the ideas of Illinois and Missouri as divided over slavery mask the fluid nature of support for or opposition to slavery in the two states.

The Confluence is a regional studies journal published by Lindenwood University, dedicated to the
diversity of ideas and disciplines of a liberal arts university. It is committed to the intersection of history, art and architecture, design, science, social science, and public policy. Its articles are diverse by design.

Articles

"Hang Him Decently and in Order”: Order, Politics, and the 1853 Lynching of Hiram, a Slave

Lynching became a visible tool for slaveowners to deal with community regulatory issues, as Zachary Dowdle suggests in this article.

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"To Preserve the Historic Lore for Which St. Louis is Famous": The St. Louis Historic Markers Program and the Construction of Community Historical Memory

Starting in the 1930s, the City of St. Louis began marking historic sites with a collection of signs for sites to draw attention to community memory. In this article, Bryan Jack investigates these signs and their meaning in downtown St. Louis.

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"Whose Blood has Flowed and Mingled with Ours": The Politics of Slavery in Illinois and Missouri in the Early Republic

The ideas of Illinois and Missouri as divided over slavery mask the fluid nature of support for or opposition to slavery in the two states, as Lawrence Celani explains in this article, the winner of the Morrow Prize presented by the Missouri Conference on History.

More Info Full Article (PDF)

Beyond the Classroom